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Ethernet Cabling



Cabling Types

10Base2

Is 10MHz Ethernet running over thin, 50 Ohm baseband coaxial cable. It is limited to 185 meters (607 ft) per unrepeated cable segment. 10Base2 is the cheapest way to Ethernet, followed closely by 10BaseT.

10BaseT

Is 10MHz Ethernet running over unshielded, twisted-pair cabling. Its maximum segment length is generally accepted to have a maximum run of 100-150M, but in actuality, it is based on signal loss in dB's (11.5dB maximum loss, source to destination). 10BaseT is the second cheapest way to Ethernet, following 10Base2.

100BaseT

Is 100MHz Ethernet running over unshielded, twisted-pair cabling. Its maximum segment length is generally accepted to have a maximum run of 100-150M, but in actuality, it is based on signal loss in dB's (11.5dB maximum loss, source to destination). 100BaseT has become the standard, and preferred, way to Ethernet.

100BaseF

Is 100MHz Ethernet running over fiber-optic cabling. Its maximum segment length depends on the signaling technology and medium used, but can go up to 2KM.

Ethernet Topography

Topography is the way the cables are laid out. 10BaseT/100BaseT twisted pair Ethernet uses a star topography. A hub/switch/router forms the center and the cables branch out from there. On the other hand, 10Base2 Ethernet uses a bus topography. A single cable runs past all computers, and each computer is connected by a T-connector.

Topography Reliability

 
Star topography is more reliable than bus topography. In a star, if one cable segment goes out, the rest of the network will continue to function. However, in a bus, if one connection goes out the entire network will not work. In a home situation, that may not matter, but in commercial installations, star topography is almost the only way to go. In fact, many critical segments of the network may have multiple connections.

 

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